"Welcome in UK???" part 2 ...

Discussion in 'WERA Vintage' started by regnat, Mar 11, 2007.

  1. regnat

    regnat Well-Known Member

    First of all, thanks very much for your unanimous reactions about my previous post. All federations being managed by the FIM, this is totally abnormal that ACU got its own rules. If there may be some discrepancies between them, it should only be related to the organisation of each club. For instance, you will not find qualification session at the CRMC (the position on the grind is determined by the drawing of lots)
    Considering that, how can they justify that a foreign expert rider has to participate to the training course? Why do they not ask Chas Mortimer (3rd & 2nd in world championship 1972-73 …) the same requirement when he comes in France for the classic Super Prix? It is totally absurd!!!:tut:
    I posted the same mail on the CRMC : 178 views and only one reply.
    Your point of views on this?
    Cheers:beer:
     
  2. charles

    charles The Transporter

    Well, no, I don't believe the FIM requires all 'federations' to be 100% similar. For American riders, I think the AMA is not helpful, but could be, and that is the obstacle for us over here to overcome. Probably there is simply not sufficient interest in competing overseas and so the AMA has no incentive (except to charge for some sort of FIM-approved license) to get into the deal. Having said that, the AMA should do it anyway, and if no one else is willing or interested, I'll write a letter and start the ball rolling for future competitors....I wonder if the ACU is bending to pressure from insurance companies to hold the "training course"???
     
  3. Mongo

    Mongo Administrator

    The problem is that most club racers in the US are not AMA racers, however that is part of why we're starting to work with the AMA more to be able to get that influence they have with the FIM to work for our riders.
     
  4. Yamaha Fan

    Yamaha Fan Well-Known Member

    While racers like Buff Harsh are every bit as capable as many professional racers this should be carefully worked out. My own experience with insurance policy's shows there is a fine line in coverage. Be rated an expert is fine, carrying a "Professional" license is different...

    Development of a license classification of AMA Vintage expert that is recognized accepted universally should keep a racer from being seen as a professional and disqualifying him/her from reasonable coverage.
     
  5. Mongo

    Mongo Administrator

    If you look at the AMA overall, while yes in roadracing they do the pro end of things, they do many many many more amateur events than pro events. So the AMA name won't actually make a difference in that regard.
     
  6. Yamaha Fan

    Yamaha Fan Well-Known Member

    Understood, just saying if this is worked out by some sort of universally accepted license designation I would not recommend it be a "professional" classification, this will have negative ramifications with respect to what type of insurance a racer can obtain and at what cost..
     
  7. charles

    charles The Transporter

    Mongo, Mighty Magnifico of Moto Madness:

    Any influence you could bring to the table would be appreciated. The AMA has the authority to create and award 'Vintage/Classic Only" license that would fulfill the needs of the FIM and its 'federations.' Yea, it would probably take some 'liaison' with the FIM, but what are these organizations for if not to further the sport? I had to jump through a few hoops, and had some Brit friends come up with some hoops of their own, to go over to England and Ireland. But it was well worth it, it was great, and I would encourage others to do it.
     
    Last edited: Mar 11, 2007
  8. Mongo

    Mongo Administrator

    Yeah I totally agree.
     
  9. charles

    charles The Transporter

    Bob are you referencing 'health' insurance or 'life' insurance? I read my Blue Cross/Blue Shield policy very carefully, and I find no reference at all to any type of classification regarding racing; in fact, there is no prohibition on racing mentioned. Perhaps you have seen policies that are more prohibitive?
     
  10. Mongo

    Mongo Administrator

    Both types can/will have language excluding professional motorsports competition.
     
  11. charles

    charles The Transporter

    Yes, I've heard this but never saw it myself. Maybe all of us should look over our policies carefully; insurance companies can be very difficult to deal with after the fact. By the way, at Donnington and Mallory, all racers had to produce proof of medical insurance coverage during registration. No proof, no racing. Maybe that's a good idea.
     
  12. Yamaha Fan

    Yamaha Fan Well-Known Member

    As Sean said most policy's have specific language regarding "Professional" racing. I was careful in checking out all of my policy's including my disability policy.
     
  13. Robin172

    Robin172 Well-Known Member

    When was this? Was it only for foreign nationals only (non UK) or was it an across the board thing?
     
  14. charles

    charles The Transporter

    It was in 2002 and 2003, and at the Post-TT at Mallory there were riders from all over, same at Donnington, so yes, everyone had to demonstrate proof of med insurance. I don't know if it was (is?) an ACU requirement or the requirement of the clubs ('federations'), and I don't know if it is still being done. My U.S. BlueCross/Blue Shield card got some intense scrutiny, though!

    By the way, as you probably are aware, the ACU medical form (for license application) requires a full medical work up, and, if you are over 50, I think it was, you must get a 'stress test' (which ain't cheap!).
     
  15. footwork

    footwork Honda Research Analyst

    I guarantee that there is something reguarding sports such as scuba, racing, parachuting etc etc. I recently got a policy and went through all of this. If you get hurt racing dont expect to collect.... call your agent
     
  16. phantom 309

    phantom 309 Well-Known Member

    Myself and six others where supose to go to england last year but it was not a ama or FIM event so we could not get ins. to go, sad state of affairs.
     
  17. Robin172

    Robin172 Well-Known Member

    I find the bit about everyone requiring proof of insurance a bit perplexing, I would have thought that all the UK nationals were covered under the National Health Service, they certainly were the last time I raced there in 2000.

    I wasn't aware of the full medical. When I first started racing in the 70's a medical was required every year, this was then changed to every 5 years (as if anything couldn't go wrong in that time!) then it was dropped in favour of just an eye exam each year and a medical every 3 years once you reached the age of 50. It will probably change again next year.


    I do believe that the ACU have some problems with their insurance company when it comes to the possiblity of re-patriation of non-EC nationals. As stated before it would be really nice if the ACU would recognise WERA and AHRMA licences, insurance might not be so much of a problem.

    I wonder if the new AMA "Roadracing" membership card will carry any weight with the ACU.
     
  18. charles

    charles The Transporter

    Any way you cut it, this is something for the AMA, FIM, ACU, and other
    race organizations to iron out. It would appear that foreign riders can compete here in the U.S. without problems, but going the other way,
    U.S. riders have problems racing overseas due to 'red tape.'

    Re the ACU medical requirements, look up and read the current medical form
    required for a license. Over 50? Full blown stress test $$$$. Screw that.
     

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